Thoughts on Meditations

Do you meditate? Have you ever tried?

I have and some days, instead of looking like this:

(Obviously she is is deep in meditation.)

I look like this. Obviously checking my Twitter feed.

(PS: FOLLOW ME ON TWITTER)

Even though meditation is very challenging for me, I am nevertheless intrigued. I came across this fascinating Yoga Journal article on meditation. It’s fairly long, but I hope you will at least give it a browse. I like the title “Your Brain on Meditation”, reminds me of those drugs commercials back in the day.

Anyway, back to the article and seriousness. You know how we say, “You are what you eat”? Well researchers studying meditators versus non-meditators are proving that our brains “are what we think”. Confusing? I’ll explain.

It’s pretty well known that meditation helps reduce stress and increase a sense of well-being….but that’s not all. How and what you think actually changes the structure and growth of your brain. If you are good at sports, you will have more neural connections in the coordination area. If you’re a student and spend a lot of time studying, you’re memory center will be jacked. When it comes to meditation, it depends on the kind of meditation. Here’s a cool excerpt from the article to help explain:

“Over the past decade, researchers have found that if you practice focusing attention on your breath or a mantra, the brain will restructure itself to make concentration easier. If you practice calm acceptance during meditation, you will develop a brain that is more resilient to stress. And if you meditate while cultivating feelings of love and compassion, your brain will develop in such a way that you spontaneously feel more connected to others.”

I think this is incredible. Basically, you can focus on any change you wish to make. With enough meditation, you alone can change the structure of your brain. This change may translate into better self-control or attention or self-love. Almost seems too good to be true, right?!

Consider giving meditation a shot. Work in a few minutes each day–consistency is the key–and pay attention to your level of patience, self-acceptance, and energy.


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